Coral Reef Conditions in the Similan Islands in 2016

Our planet is suffering at present the most important coral bleaching in its history. Surprisingly, there was little noticeable whitening of the dive sites around the Similan Islands. While at the time the largest living structure on Earth, the Great Barrier Reef is dying at an alarming rate. A significant amount of coral found in the Similan Islands today is relatively young and has grown since the bleaching of 2010. It has already been demonstrated that some of these corals, especially those exposed to waves of large periods described above, are already more resistant to temperature variation under water.It is possible that the Similan Islands is starting to withstand stressful conditions and can continue their regeneration.

When the National Park closed for the southwest monsoon in May 2016, coral reefs in the Similan Islands were in their best conditions since 2010. It appears that the global bleaching of 2015 would not have affected them yet, but it could change. We will carry on updating this section as regularly as possible. As a diver, one thing is clear. If you want to see magnificent coral reefs and healthy regardless of location, you must come and see them soon. Unfortunately, they could one day be brought to disappear.

It is possible that the Similan Islands is starting to withstand stressful conditions and can continue their regeneration. When the National Park closed for the southwest monsoon in May 2016, coral reefs in the Similan Islands were in their best conditions since 2010. It appears that the global bleaching of 2015 would not have affected them yet, but it could change. We will carry on updating this section as regularly as possible. As a diver, one thing is clear. If you want to see magnificent coral reefs and healthy regardless of location, you must come and see them soon. Unfortunately, they could one day be brought to disappear.

Coral Bleeching in Thailand since 2014

What Can We Do?

As a human being, what we can do is reduce global warming. However, as a diver, the best thing you can do is to act responsibly. As already mentioned, coral bleaching has, even more, adverse consequences on a reef already under stress. Pollution and human interaction have very damaging impacts, so here are some tips to act properly when visiting dive the Similan Islands.

Do not feed the animals. The fish are unable to digest many foods, which can cause their internal damage. Turtles can be attracted to the boat creating a risk of injury from propellers. Do not use sunscreen before diving in the water because the content in chemicals is toxic to the reef. Do not touch the coral. The oil residue present on our skin can damage the delicate coral polyps. Watch your palms. Do your best to keep a good buoyancy, and if you’re not comfortable, stay a few meters of the reef.

Finally, the Similan Islands are under the protection of the Thailand National Park. If you see tour operators and tourists breaking the rules of the national park, then please report it. If everyone acts with the same level of responsibility, and we can help preserve our reefs as long as possible.

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Coral Reef Conditions in the Similan Islands in 2016
Article Name
Coral Reef Conditions in the Similan Islands in 2016
Description
Our planet is suffering at present the most important coral bleaching in its history. Surprisingly, there was little noticeable whitening of the dive sites around the Similan Islands. While at the time the largest living structure on Earth, the Great Barrier Reef is dying at an alarming rate. A significant amount of coral found in the Similan Islands today is relatively young and has grown since the bleaching of 2010. It has already been demonstrated that some of these corals, especially those exposed to waves of large periods described above, are already more resistant to temperature variation under water.It is possible that the Similan Islands is starting to withstand stressful conditions and can continue their regeneration.
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